Image 1 of 1

05212012_eclipse_Tokyo_215cr.jpg

May 21, 2012, Shinjuku, Tokyo Prefecture, Japan: just as the weekday was beginning in Tokyo, residents of this city and other areas of Japan were treated to a full annular, or ?ring of fire eclipse?. In Japanese, this type of eclipse is called a ?kinkan nishoku?, or gold crown eclipse. For Tokyoites, the sweet spot occurred at 7:34 and continued from Japan, arcing across the central Pacific region and into the Western States of the USA. Although Tokyo experienced partly cloudy conditions, the eclipse could be fully seen here at Tokyo?s Shinjuku Station, just as the morning commute began. Shinjuku Station is the busiest train station in the world and many paused on stairwells, sidewalks and footbridges to observe this solar phenomenon which has not occurred in Tokyo since 1839. (Torin Boyd/Polaris Images)...
Copyright
Torin Boyd 2012
Image Size
4452x2912 / 1.7MB
Contained in galleries
May 21, 2012, Shinjuku, Tokyo Prefecture, Japan: just as the weekday was beginning in Tokyo, residents of this city and other areas of Japan were treated to a full annular, or ?ring of fire eclipse?. In Japanese, this type of eclipse is called a ?kinkan nishoku?, or gold crown eclipse. For Tokyoites, the sweet spot occurred at 7:34 and continued from Japan, arcing across the central Pacific region and into the Western States of the USA. Although Tokyo experienced partly cloudy conditions, the eclipse could be fully seen here at Tokyo?s Shinjuku Station, just as the morning commute began. Shinjuku Station is the busiest train station in the world and many paused on stairwells, sidewalks and footbridges to observe this solar phenomenon which has not occurred in Tokyo since 1839. (Torin Boyd/Polaris Images)...