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March 10, 2012, Rikuzentakata, Iwate, Japan: this sole pine tree has now become a legendary symbol of hope for not only the people of Rikuzentakata, but all of Japan. That is because its the sole survivor of Takata-Matsubara, a two-kilometer (1.2 mile) stretch of shoreline in Rikuzentakata that was lined with seventy thousand pines trees. When the March 11, 2011 tsunami slammed into this city wiping it off the face of the Earth, only this single ten meter (appr 30 feet), two hundred year-old tree remained from the forest. However, due to the salinated ground water around tree, the roots became ill but experts have been nurturing and protecting it. It now looks like the tree will survive...The spectacular lighting on this tree was from a live Japanese TV news broadcast on the eve of the tsunami and quake. The building in the background is the remnants of a youth hostel. A total of 1555 people perished in Rikuzentakata, while 291 are still missing. (Torin Boyd/Polaris Images).
Copyright
Torin Boyd 2012
Image Size
5120x3413 / 3.5MB
Contained in galleries
March 10, 2012, Rikuzentakata, Iwate, Japan: this sole pine tree has now become a legendary symbol of hope for not only the people of Rikuzentakata, but all of Japan. That is because its the sole survivor of Takata-Matsubara, a two-kilometer (1.2 mile) stretch of shoreline in Rikuzentakata that was lined with seventy thousand pines trees. When the March 11, 2011 tsunami slammed into this city wiping it off the face of the Earth, only this single ten meter (appr 30 feet), two hundred year-old tree remained from the forest. However, due to the salinated ground water around tree, the roots became ill but experts have been nurturing and protecting it. It now looks like the tree will survive...The spectacular lighting on this tree was from a live Japanese TV news broadcast on the eve of the tsunami and quake. The building in the background is the remnants of a youth hostel.  A total of 1555 people perished in Rikuzentakata, while 291 are still missing.  (Torin Boyd/Polaris Images).