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Tokyo Historical Parade (Tokyo Jidai Matsuri) on the 400th anniversary of Tokyo:..Dancers of the Asakusa Dera Mai Hozon-kai perform the white heron dance (Shirasagi no Mai). This dance troupe based in the Asakusa district of Tokyo strive to preserve traditional Japanese dance. This particular dance was mentioned in a 1652 scroll called the Sensoji Keian Engi Emaki, that described the dancers and their costumes in a festival parade. In 1968, the Asakusa Tourist Federation revived this dance which is rooted in Shinto ceremony rituals first performed in Kyoto over a 1000 years ago. At that time, it was performed in order to drive away a plague epidemic...This annual festival held on National Culture Day (Nov. 3) in Tokyo's Asakusa district, recreates Tokyo's history and culture. Now in it's fourth year, it includes period costumes from 1300 years ago up to the 20th century. The majority of it focuses on the past 550 years, including the founding of Edo Castle in 1457 by Dokan Ota, and the arrival of Japan's most famous shogun, Ieyasu Tokugawa in 1590, who unified Japan and established his shoganate there in 1603. Other aspects include the founding of Asakusa Sensoji Temple, which was built on the banks of the Sumida River after the area became a place of worship when an apparition of Kannon emerged from the river in 628...With 2003 being the 400th anniversary of Tokyo, this year's celebrations took on special meaning to commemorate the city's past. Over 1600 performers participated in the procession, comprised of 35 teams who represented their era, as well as the various civic groups, ward offices, religious, cultural and historical organizations that backed them..
Copyright
© Torin Boyd 2009
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3510x2380 / 2.7MB
Contained in galleries
Tokyo Historical Parade (Tokyo Jidai Matsuri) on the 400th anniversary of Tokyo:..Dancers of the Asakusa Dera Mai Hozon-kai perform the white heron dance (Shirasagi no Mai). This dance troupe based in the Asakusa district of Tokyo strive to preserve traditional Japanese dance. This particular dance was mentioned in a 1652 scroll called the Sensoji Keian Engi Emaki, that described the dancers and their costumes in a festival parade. In 1968, the Asakusa Tourist Federation revived this dance which is rooted in Shinto ceremony rituals first performed in Kyoto over a 1000 years ago. At that time, it was performed in order to drive away a plague epidemic...This annual festival held on National Culture Day (Nov. 3) in Tokyo's Asakusa district, recreates Tokyo's history and culture. Now in it's fourth year, it includes period costumes from 1300 years ago up to the 20th century. The majority of it focuses on the past 550 years, including the founding of Edo Castle in 1457 by Dokan Ota, and the arrival of Japan's most famous shogun, Ieyasu Tokugawa in 1590, who unified Japan and established his shoganate there in 1603. Other aspects include the founding of Asakusa Sensoji Temple, which was built on the banks of the Sumida River after the area became a place of worship when an apparition of Kannon emerged from the river in 628...With 2003 being the 400th anniversary of Tokyo, this year's celebrations took on special meaning to commemorate the city's past. Over 1600 performers participated in the procession, comprised of 35 teams who represented their era, as well as the various civic groups, ward offices, religious, cultural and historical organizations that backed them..