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Hagi, an historic town in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan has a reputation for its ceramics called "Hagi yaki". This traditional glazed ware is produced in about 100 kilns around the town which includes Hattori Tenryu Pottery Studio (seen here). Hagi ware is crafted mostly in muted colors with subtle tone gradations and simplistic lines. It's two classic glazes are a thin yellow and milky straw white. Other glazes used include brown, red and pale purple. The most popular of Hagi ware are tea bowls which have unique wedge shaped nicks on the base. These nicks were originally put there as intentional flaws that made them damaged goods so they could be bought by commoners. This image shows traditional Hagi ware artist Yoshie Hattori making tea cups (note the base notching in some of these photos). Hattori has been making pottery here since 1975 and can throw between 200 to 250 pieces on the wheel per day.
Copyright
Torin Boyd 2007 - all rights reserved.
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3072x2048 / 1.3MB
Contained in galleries
Hagi, an historic town in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan has a reputation for its ceramics called "Hagi yaki". This traditional glazed ware is produced in about 100 kilns around the town which includes Hattori Tenryu Pottery Studio (seen here). Hagi ware is crafted mostly in muted colors with subtle tone gradations and simplistic lines. It's two classic glazes are a thin yellow and milky straw white. Other glazes used include brown, red and pale purple. The most popular of Hagi ware are tea bowls which have unique wedge shaped nicks on the base. These nicks were originally put there as intentional flaws that made them damaged goods so they could be bought by commoners. This image shows traditional Hagi ware artist Yoshie Hattori making tea cups (note the base notching in some of these photos). Hattori has been making pottery here since 1975 and can throw between 200 to 250 pieces on the wheel per day.