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March 10, 2015 - Tokyo, Japan) At Yokoamichi Park in Tokyo is the “Dwelling of Remembrance”, a monument dedicated to those killed during the Tokyo air raids of World War II. Opened in 2001, this cenotaph was designed by Kimio Tsuchiya and contains the names of those killed by Allied air raids from 1942 to 1945. On March 10, 2015, the 70th anniversary of the Great Tokyo Air Raid, this monument was opened to family members and survivors of the air raid. Also within the grounds of Yokoamichi Park is an ossuary or charnel house, where the remains of 105,400 people killed in all the WW II air raids are interred. The Great Tokyo Air Raid was carried out by American B-29 Superfortress bombers under the command of General Curtis LeMay. This massive air raid devastated the city and caused the deaths of 100,000 in a single night. Code named "Operation Meetinghouse," this was the single most destructive bombing raid in history, more than the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. During that early morning raid, LeMay’s low flying bombers unloaded 2500 tons of bombs on Tokyo, each a 250 kilo incendiary bomb that contained 38 "boomlet" pipes filled with napalm that incinerated anything in its path. Strong winds that night also contributed to fierce non-escapable firestorms. This air raid receives much less attention than the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as both the US and Japanese governments care not to publicize the attack. Historic accounts have concluded the raid was unnecessary and could have been prevented by either side. (Torin Boyd/Polaris).
Copyright
Torin Boyd
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5616x3744 / 4.7MB
Contained in galleries
March 10, 2015 - Tokyo, Japan) At Yokoamichi Park in Tokyo is the “Dwelling of Remembrance”, a monument dedicated to those killed during the Tokyo air raids of World War II. Opened in 2001, this cenotaph was designed by Kimio Tsuchiya and contains the names of those killed by Allied air raids from 1942 to 1945. On March 10, 2015, the 70th anniversary of the Great Tokyo Air Raid, this monument was opened to family members and survivors of the air raid. Also within the grounds of Yokoamichi Park is an ossuary or charnel house, where the remains of 105,400 people killed in all the WW II air raids are interred. The Great Tokyo Air Raid was carried out by American B-29 Superfortress bombers under the command of General Curtis LeMay. This massive air raid devastated the city and caused the deaths of 100,000 in a single night. Code named "Operation Meetinghouse," this was the single most destructive bombing raid in history, more than the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. During that early morning raid, LeMay’s low flying bombers unloaded 2500 tons of bombs on Tokyo, each a 250 kilo incendiary bomb that contained 38 "boomlet" pipes filled with napalm that incinerated anything in its path. Strong winds that night also contributed to fierce non-escapable firestorms. This air raid receives much less attention than the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki as both the US and Japanese governments care not to publicize the attack. Historic accounts have concluded the raid was unnecessary and could have been prevented by either side. (Torin Boyd/Polaris).