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Ayana (pink uniform), who works at Royal Milk Cafe and Aromacare six days a week only goes by her first name. When asked her age she replied "eien juhasai" which in Japanese means "forever 18". She has been working here for one year. The customer (in purple t-shirt) is 27 year old Keisuke Masaki, a hair stylist who was visiting here on his day off. This was his seventh visit to Royal Milk but he commented "its so enjoyable here, if I couldn't come anymore it would be really sad"...Background: This is Royal Milk Cafe and Aromacare, a maid cafe located in Tokyo's electronic district of Akihabara. Here cute young women clad in frilly maid uniforms literally wait on customers hand and foot, offering a fantasy experience inspired by manga and anime heroines. Mostly a hangout for "otaku", the Japanese term for geeks and social outcasts who identify more with the virtual world than regular life, Royal Milk caters to their concept of "moe", the attraction to characters in the anime, manga and video game fantasy worlds...Besides the popular entrance greeting of "welcome home my master", services here include simple and inexpensive cafe food, aroma therapy called "body care" and "foot care", and one-on-one chats in a private rooms. This hanky-panky free service ranges in price from 2000 JPY ($18) to 9000 JPY ($78), depending on the duration...Japanese maid cafes first sprang up in Tokyo's Akihabara district in 2001, and there are now over 30 of them in the area. But this is just a tip of the iceberg for Japan's otaku industry which has 3 million consumers who spend an estimated $5 billion annually. Most otaku are men between the ages of 18 to 45 but current trends show more women are among them...Royal Milk opened in June 2005 and normally has four to six maids working at all times and can be found on the web at: http://r-milk.com.
Copyright
© Torin Boyd 2009
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3219x2140 / 1.5MB
Contained in galleries
Ayana (pink uniform), who works at Royal Milk Cafe and Aromacare six days a week only goes by her first name. When asked her age she replied "eien juhasai" which in Japanese means "forever 18".  She has been working here for one year. The customer (in purple t-shirt) is 27 year old Keisuke Masaki, a hair stylist who was visiting here on his day off. This was his seventh visit to Royal Milk but he commented "its so enjoyable here, if I couldn't come anymore it would be really sad"...Background:  This is Royal Milk Cafe and Aromacare, a maid cafe located in Tokyo's electronic district of Akihabara. Here cute young women clad in frilly maid uniforms literally wait on customers hand and foot, offering a fantasy experience inspired by manga and anime heroines. Mostly a hangout for "otaku", the Japanese term for geeks and social outcasts who identify more with the virtual world than regular life, Royal Milk caters to their concept of "moe", the attraction to characters in the anime, manga and video game fantasy worlds...Besides the popular entrance greeting of "welcome home my master", services here include simple and inexpensive cafe food, aroma therapy called "body care" and "foot care", and one-on-one chats in a private rooms. This hanky-panky free service ranges in price from 2000 JPY ($18) to 9000 JPY ($78), depending on the duration...Japanese maid cafes first sprang up in Tokyo's Akihabara district in 2001, and there are now over 30 of them in the area. But this is just a tip of the iceberg for Japan's otaku industry which has 3 million consumers who spend an estimated $5 billion annually. Most otaku are men between the ages of 18 to 45 but current trends show more women are among them...Royal Milk opened in June 2005 and normally has four to six maids working at all times and can be found on the web at: http://r-milk.com.