Image 1 of 1

Fukuya_Yuji_005.jpg

Nov. 27, 2009, Sakai City, Japan: This is Yuji Fukuya, age 50, a former plant manager from Hokkaido who came to the Tojinbo cliffs in Fukui Prefecture with the intent of committing suicide, but was instead saved by Yukio Shige. He is seen here at Shige’s cafe on Nov. 27, 2009. As for Mr. Shige, the man who turned his life around, he is a 65 y/o retired policeman from Fukui Prefecture who founded the NPO Kokoro ni Hibiku Bunshu Henshukyoku in order to prevent suicides along the rocky cliffs at Tojinbo. Shige helped Fukuya get back on his feet and Fukuya currently shares as apartment with two other rescuees saved by Shige. Additionally, Mr. Fukuya works with Shige’s NPO to help prevent other suicides at Tojinbo. This scenic tourist spot located on the Japan Sea coast in Sakai City, Fukui Prefecture has become a popular suicide spot, with twenty suicides occurring here in 2008 according to city officials. Shige took up his cause in 2004, just before retirement as a police deputy at a nearby police station where he was posted. When he discovered how many suicides were occurring here, he began patrolling the cliffs of Tojinbo in order to spot those contemplating suicide. Shige soon began easily spotting distressed individuals and would talk to them out of their attempts to end their lives. Upon retirement he opened a small cafe at Tojinbo where he also set up his NPO. Since then other volunteers have joined his cause and as of November 2009, Shige explains that he and his group have talked 222 out of committing suicide. They do this by patrolling the cliffs daily with binoculars in hand, and when they spot someone they kindly approach them and coax them away to Shige’s cafe where they offer them tea and rice cakes. He also sees them safely home, and in cases where an individual is homeless, he finds them accommodations. However there are still some that slip past his watchful eyes as so far in 2009 thirteen people have jumped to their deaths here. Japan has one of
Copyright
Torin Boyd 2009 - All Rights Reserved
Image Size
2699x4096 / 2.2MB
Contained in galleries
Nov. 27, 2009, Sakai City, Japan: This is Yuji Fukuya, age 50, a former plant manager from Hokkaido who came to the Tojinbo cliffs in Fukui Prefecture with the intent of committing suicide, but was instead saved by Yukio Shige. He is seen here at Shige’s cafe on Nov. 27, 2009. As for Mr. Shige, the man who turned his life around, he is a 65 y/o retired policeman from Fukui Prefecture who founded the NPO Kokoro ni Hibiku Bunshu Henshukyoku in order to prevent suicides along the rocky cliffs at Tojinbo. Shige helped Fukuya get back on his feet and Fukuya currently shares as apartment with two other rescuees saved by Shige. Additionally, Mr. Fukuya works with Shige’s NPO to help prevent other suicides at Tojinbo. This scenic tourist spot located on the Japan Sea coast in Sakai City, Fukui Prefecture has become a popular suicide spot, with twenty suicides occurring here in 2008 according to city officials. Shige took up his cause in 2004, just before retirement as a police deputy at a nearby police station where he was posted. When he discovered how many suicides were occurring here, he began patrolling the cliffs of Tojinbo in order to spot those contemplating suicide. Shige soon began easily spotting distressed individuals and would talk to them out of their attempts to end their lives. Upon retirement he opened a small cafe at Tojinbo where he also set up his NPO. Since then other volunteers have joined his cause and as of November 2009, Shige explains that he and his group have talked 222 out of committing suicide. They do this by patrolling the cliffs daily with binoculars in hand, and when they spot someone they kindly approach them and coax them away to Shige’s cafe where they offer them tea and rice cakes. He also sees them safely home, and in cases where an individual is homeless, he finds them accommodations. However there are still some that slip past his watchful eyes as so far in 2009 thirteen people have jumped to their deaths here. Japan has one of