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Earthquake_tunnels_Tokyo.jpg

This is what's called a "Common Utility Duct" which are being constructed underneath national roadways in Tokyo. According to Japan's Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, these tunnels are being built to reduce utility construction which clogs many roadways. More importantly, these tunnels are being built to protect "lifelines" in the event of major earthquakes. These lifelines run through the Common Utility Ducts and include electricity, telephone, gas, water and sewage lines. As underground tunnels, they are more resistant to earthquakes due to the tunnels' ability to shift with the Earth when quakes occur...Currently in central Tokyo's 23 ward district, the government is building 161 kilometers (96.6 miles) of these tunnels which will include 5600 kilometers (3360 miles) of lifelines. These tunnels are largely funded by the government, but some of the costs are shared by the utility companies. The average cost of building these tunnels is 7 billion yen per kilometer ($68.6 million per .6 mile). Other tunnels are being built in other major cities across Japan, with a nationwide total of 510 kilometers (306 miles). This is considered the most for any country...The tunnel in this photograph shows the Hibiya Common Utility Duct located next to Japan's Imperial Palace. This is located on average 30 to 40 meters (appr. 98 to 131 ft.). When completed in 2010 it will be 1457 meters long (4780 ft.). It will connect to a second tunnel called the Azabu CUD which is also under construction. The men in the photo are tunnel workers, and the colored lights are distance markers placed every 50 meters.
Copyright
Torin Boyd 2009
Image Size
3072x2048 / 1.3MB
Contained in galleries
This is what's called a "Common Utility Duct" which are being constructed underneath national roadways in Tokyo. According to Japan's Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport, these tunnels are being built to reduce utility construction which clogs many roadways. More importantly, these tunnels are being built to protect "lifelines" in the event of major earthquakes. These lifelines run through the Common Utility Ducts and include electricity, telephone, gas, water and sewage lines. As underground tunnels, they are more resistant to earthquakes due to the tunnels' ability to shift with the Earth when quakes occur...Currently in central Tokyo's 23 ward district, the government is building 161 kilometers (96.6 miles) of these tunnels which will include 5600 kilometers (3360 miles) of lifelines. These tunnels are largely funded by the government, but some of the costs are shared by the utility companies. The average cost of building these tunnels is 7 billion yen per kilometer ($68.6 million per .6 mile). Other tunnels are being built in other major cities across Japan, with a nationwide total of 510 kilometers (306 miles). This is considered the most for any country...The tunnel in this photograph shows the Hibiya Common Utility Duct located next to Japan's Imperial Palace. This is located on average 30 to 40 meters (appr. 98 to 131 ft.). When completed in 2010 it will be 1457 meters long (4780 ft.). It will connect to a second tunnel called the Azabu CUD which is also under construction. The men in the photo are tunnel workers, and the colored lights are distance markers placed every 50 meters.